Archive for the 'Trends' Category

It´s an accounting issue (2)

continued from here:

Start-up & Transition and Asset Ownership

several issues that need to be considered around start-up & transition and asset ownership including:

  • Asset ownership:  Asset valuations, Lease Types
  • Start-up, Transition, Transformation and One-Time Charges: Expensed vs Capitalization
  • Restructuring costs
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The Dark Side of Cloud Computing

cio.com:

Companies tapping into virtual infrastructure through cloud computing should take another look at their security plans, say experts at the Black Hat Security Conference. From legal protection to phishing, here are five cloud security issues to consider.

Here are they:

  1. Cloud offers less legal protection
  2. You don’t own the hardware
  3. Strong policies and user education required
  4. Don’t trust machine instances
  5. Rethink your assumptions

Interesting slides from the recent Black Hat conference here. Unfortunately the paper is missing, but probably need just a recheck next week here (or see for Haroon Meer under the speaker on the right side here.

The Arduino has landed…

I admit it, I am too curious to pass the opportunity to play with another gadget.

Today has a Arduino landed, fast shipped from Watterod. What a nice toy.

Some link for those that ask themselves “what the hell is an Arduino”.

The projects homepage: www.arduino.cc

Good books on Arduino from O´Reilly:

German c´t had an article recently and as a nice page with a hell of links.

Ideas for dozens answers the question “Why the Arduino Matters“, and yes, this could be true.

Jan-Piet Mens has created a monitor for Nagios and Icinga, the Naguino.

An interesting project is TinkerKit, an Arduino-compatible physical computing prototyping toolkit aimed at design professionals. Still under development, but very interesting.

And finally, O´Reilly has also a book on Arduino in german:

It´s an accounting issue…

John Klee from TPI starts a series of posts on Accounting Considerations in Sourcing Environments. This is going to be interesting:

What accounting issues can impact the Sourcing strategy and/or RFP structure?

  • Asset ownership:  asset valuations, embedded leases in service contracts, lease capitalization
  • Start-up, transition and one time charges:  expensed vs. capitalization
  • Potential alliance agreements:  Related party transactions, gross vs. net revenue recognition
  • Regulatory compliance:  Sarbanes-Oxley Act, SAS70, etc
  • Pricing structure:  service provider revenue recognition
    • After collecting cash, recognizing the revenue streams related to those collections is often a Service providers management’s greatest concern

Clouds on a sunny and hot day

eweek.com:  Informatica Launches Data Integration Service in the Cloud

Interesting:

PowerCenter Cloud Edition, which became available on July 23, uses Amazon EC2, Amazon SimpleDB and Amazon S3 (storage) to provide access to enterprise data sources such as relational databases, flat files and SAAS (software-as-a-service)applications.

Bruce Cleveland: The SaaS Business Model and Some Common Legal Questions – worth a read. I believe these kind of issues is way underestimated.

David Linthicum: Will Cloud Computing kill the Datacenter?

Probably not. While cloud computing is a great fit for some applications, and/or other architectural components, it typically won’t be a fit for all applications and/or architectural components. There will always be some data, services, processes, and complete applications that you want to keep within your firewall for a number of reasons, including: Compliance, privacy, fear, control, and cost.

Brian Sommer: Is Your IT Shop Mature Enough for Cloud Computing?

CIOs will need to marry their needs and business requirements with the true capabilities of cloud capability providers. I suspect that some providers offer a cloud ‘space’ and not much else. CIOs will likely need more. They’ll want to work with providers that can advise them on needed capabilities in their application portfolio, changes they’ll need to make in their applications, techniques and technologies required to make cloud apps integrate with legacy apps, etc. If a cloud provider just offers bandwidth and disk storage, their solution may be woefully inadequate.

Yes, that´s what it boils down to. Just the “cloud space” is not that a big step from managed hosting of individual servers.

Joe McKendrick: Do we need cloud oriented architecture?

Absolutely. More than ever, as environments get quite complex if a multitude of services, both external with multiple providers plus internal retained have to be integrated.

He is linking to a post from ZAPLinks Ronald Schmelzer: Who’s Architecting the Cloud?

The essence:

Given that too few cloud computing providers have your business in mind when they architect their solutions, and the ones that have a process-specific business model and approach aren’t concerned with your specific business, it lands upon the laps of enterprise architects within the organization to plan, manage, and govern their own architecture. Once again, the refrain is that SOA is not something you buy, but something you do. Perhaps we can start hearing the same mantra with cloud computing? Or will the cloud succumb to the same short-sighted, market pressure that doomed the ASP model and still plagues SaaS approaches? It’s not up to vendors to answer this question. It’s up to you… the enterprise architect. There are no short-cuts to EA.

Amen.


Cloudy summer

I admit it, posting was on hold for quite a while due to heavy workload and summer vacation. Now again some links about one of the topics I am interested in.

The Datacenter as Computer is a must-read for anyone interested in the topic, written by Luiz André Barroso and Urs Hölzle of Google. And it is easy to read (it took me just two afternoons on the beach…). Download the PDF here.

Michael Manos of Microsoft on their Datacenter vision: Our Vision for Generation 4 Modular Data Centers – One way of Getting it just right . .

The AWS blog is always worth stopping by to see what is going on at Amazon. Good stuff from July 13:  Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling, and CloudWatch Resources

I believe Jeff Barr (who is also writing on the AWS Blog) is collecting links on AWS and related tools as awsbuzz on delicious. Recommended to follow.

Arstechnica:  Google reveals plans for Chrome cloud synchronization. This is not really surprising, isn´t it?

And Google is beating on the bush with “Going Google” and migrating away from e.g. Lotus Notes. I believe this is just for Mail and Calendar, not for Applications. Make up your mind yourself.

What makes a weblog a weblog?

Oldie, but Goldie. By Dave Winer. From 2003, but still fresh.

Rather than saying “I know it when I see it” I wanted to list all the known features of weblog software, but more important, get to the heart of what a weblog is, and how a weblog is different from a Wiki, or a news site managed with software like Vignette or Interwoven. I draw from my experience developing and using weblog software (Manila, Radio UserLand) and using competitive products such as Blogger and Movable Type.


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