Archive for the 'SaaS' Category

It´s an accounting issue (3 + 4)

continued from here:

Agreement Language

There are several issues that must be considered around agreement language that can impact how the revenue is reported.

  • Gross versus Net Revenue reporting: Service provider costs, related party transactions and alliance agreements.
  • Pricing structure and embedded leases

Compliance and Controls

Compliance and control is important since it offers assurances to investors and more often than not, it is the law.

Points and Reminders:
• Clients and service providers need their accounting experts to sign off on any accounting treatments.
• Every contract can be different; slight nuances to contract language can alter accounting treatments.
• Recognizing and addressing these issues upfront, in the client’s sourcing strategy, improves their RFP and negotiation position.
• Everyone benefits from a clearly defined strategy.

And one last parting thought, “It’s an Accounting Issue.  No, it’s a Contract Issue.”

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It´s an accounting issue (2)

continued from here:

Start-up & Transition and Asset Ownership

several issues that need to be considered around start-up & transition and asset ownership including:

  • Asset ownership:  Asset valuations, Lease Types
  • Start-up, Transition, Transformation and One-Time Charges: Expensed vs Capitalization
  • Restructuring costs

It´s an accounting issue…

John Klee from TPI starts a series of posts on Accounting Considerations in Sourcing Environments. This is going to be interesting:

What accounting issues can impact the Sourcing strategy and/or RFP structure?

  • Asset ownership:  asset valuations, embedded leases in service contracts, lease capitalization
  • Start-up, transition and one time charges:  expensed vs. capitalization
  • Potential alliance agreements:  Related party transactions, gross vs. net revenue recognition
  • Regulatory compliance:  Sarbanes-Oxley Act, SAS70, etc
  • Pricing structure:  service provider revenue recognition
    • After collecting cash, recognizing the revenue streams related to those collections is often a Service providers management’s greatest concern

Closed platforms are like ice cubes in a glass of water

Closed platforms are like ice cubes in a glass of water. They float for a while. They change the temperature of the liquid. Ultimately however, the ice cube eventually melts into the wider web.

Jean-Marc Liotier in a comment to an worth reading article in the LA Times about Twitter (which is down at the moment…)

(via)

Clouds on a sunny and hot day

eweek.com:  Informatica Launches Data Integration Service in the Cloud

Interesting:

PowerCenter Cloud Edition, which became available on July 23, uses Amazon EC2, Amazon SimpleDB and Amazon S3 (storage) to provide access to enterprise data sources such as relational databases, flat files and SAAS (software-as-a-service)applications.

Bruce Cleveland: The SaaS Business Model and Some Common Legal Questions – worth a read. I believe these kind of issues is way underestimated.

David Linthicum: Will Cloud Computing kill the Datacenter?

Probably not. While cloud computing is a great fit for some applications, and/or other architectural components, it typically won’t be a fit for all applications and/or architectural components. There will always be some data, services, processes, and complete applications that you want to keep within your firewall for a number of reasons, including: Compliance, privacy, fear, control, and cost.

Brian Sommer: Is Your IT Shop Mature Enough for Cloud Computing?

CIOs will need to marry their needs and business requirements with the true capabilities of cloud capability providers. I suspect that some providers offer a cloud ‘space’ and not much else. CIOs will likely need more. They’ll want to work with providers that can advise them on needed capabilities in their application portfolio, changes they’ll need to make in their applications, techniques and technologies required to make cloud apps integrate with legacy apps, etc. If a cloud provider just offers bandwidth and disk storage, their solution may be woefully inadequate.

Yes, that´s what it boils down to. Just the “cloud space” is not that a big step from managed hosting of individual servers.

Joe McKendrick: Do we need cloud oriented architecture?

Absolutely. More than ever, as environments get quite complex if a multitude of services, both external with multiple providers plus internal retained have to be integrated.

He is linking to a post from ZAPLinks Ronald Schmelzer: Who’s Architecting the Cloud?

The essence:

Given that too few cloud computing providers have your business in mind when they architect their solutions, and the ones that have a process-specific business model and approach aren’t concerned with your specific business, it lands upon the laps of enterprise architects within the organization to plan, manage, and govern their own architecture. Once again, the refrain is that SOA is not something you buy, but something you do. Perhaps we can start hearing the same mantra with cloud computing? Or will the cloud succumb to the same short-sighted, market pressure that doomed the ASP model and still plagues SaaS approaches? It’s not up to vendors to answer this question. It’s up to you… the enterprise architect. There are no short-cuts to EA.

Amen.


Cloudy summer

I admit it, posting was on hold for quite a while due to heavy workload and summer vacation. Now again some links about one of the topics I am interested in.

The Datacenter as Computer is a must-read for anyone interested in the topic, written by Luiz André Barroso and Urs Hölzle of Google. And it is easy to read (it took me just two afternoons on the beach…). Download the PDF here.

Michael Manos of Microsoft on their Datacenter vision: Our Vision for Generation 4 Modular Data Centers – One way of Getting it just right . .

The AWS blog is always worth stopping by to see what is going on at Amazon. Good stuff from July 13:  Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling, and CloudWatch Resources

I believe Jeff Barr (who is also writing on the AWS Blog) is collecting links on AWS and related tools as awsbuzz on delicious. Recommended to follow.

Arstechnica:  Google reveals plans for Chrome cloud synchronization. This is not really surprising, isn´t it?

And Google is beating on the bush with “Going Google” and migrating away from e.g. Lotus Notes. I believe this is just for Mail and Calendar, not for Applications. Make up your mind yourself.

Pipes in Text

A few days ago, Stefan joined a rant of Peter Williams on Yahoo! Pipes lack of a text representation:

While for many models (and programs, and anything in between) having a visual representation is nice when you want to read (or view) it, visual authoring sucks in the vast majority of cases. Sadly, being able to efficiently edit something in a text editor, with versioning and diff support and so on is in general not what impresses those who make purchasing decisions.

This is so true.

One more day, and he links to a great presentation on Pipes and the Y! Query Language. Says Abel Avram in the post that directs to the presentation by Jonathan Trevor , captured at QCon SF 2008 (53 mins):

Yahoo Pipes uses a visual tool to specify a series of pipes through which input data flows and is filtered and processed in various ways. There are many data sources like personal data, CSV, feeds, web pages, services like Flick, Yahoo Search, and others. Processing is done through operators like: Filter, Loop, Regex, Sort, Union, and others. The result is shown in a web page, a feed, or given to an application. The service runs in Yahoo’s cloud, is free and does not offer security protection for sensitive data since anyone can copy and run a pipe made by someone else.

YQL is similar to Pipes but uses a textual textual language and can process both Yahoo web services data and any structured data with an URL. It has an SQL like syntax with three statements: SELECT, SHOW, DESC. This approach is more powerful and the applications created are protected.

Thanks, this is what a lot of people are looking for.