Posts Tagged 'Twitter'

Jahresende-Links

So, jetzt zum Jahresabschluss die gesammelten Links der letzten paar Wochen. Sorry, aber wegen zu vielen Reisen vor den Feiertagen und PC-Abstinenz über Weihnachten etwas verzögert:

Nicht ganz neu, aber passend zur aktuellen Eskalation im Nahen Osten: Evolutionary Psychology, Memes and the Origin of War

The present article proposes an evolutionary psychology based model of social prediction, particularly for wars and related social disruption such as riots and suicide bombers.

Frankfurt Story – Danke Robert, gut davon zu lesen, bin ja schliesslich in Frankfurt am Main geboren…

Wo ist das Geld geblieben? – Eine Spurensuche bei der Zeit

The benefits of a monthly recurring revenue model in tough economic times -  Jason Fried von 37signals. So wahr.

Palamida: In a Time of Less, Do More with Open Source: Top 25 Open Source Projects That Will Help Trim Development Budgets (via)

70 Tools Freelancers Rely on Most – auch was für euch dabei?

Und dazu Web Worker Daily: 6 Free, Open Source Resources for Web Workers

Die Jungs und Mädels von EDS sollten´s eigentlich wissen, zumindestens aber eine Meinung haben: How Will Cloud Computing Affect the Information Technology Outsourcing Marketplace? (via)

Endlich mal erklärt ;-) : But What Exactly “Is” Cloud Computing? (via)

Stefan verweist auf ein Paper zum Tema XML Performance. Lesen!

Das Wall Street Journal: Outsourcing: Not Immune to the Downturn, But Holding Up – gibt ja sicherlich noch eine Menge, die Outsourcing primär als Mittel zur Kostensenkung sehen. Der “Do my mess for less”-Ansatz geht aber schnell in die Hose, aber manch lernen eben nur durch Schmerz.

A B2B Recession Survival Kit: Three Not-so-painful Tips for Thriving in a Miserable Economy:

  • Survival Strategy #1: Cut the waste.
  • Survival Strategy #2: Harvest the “best practices” of other companies.
  • Survival Strategy #3: Ask customers what they want.

GMail Blog: SMS messaging for chat – wahrscheinlich (?) bis jetzt nur in USA

Stephen Fry reist mit leichtem Gepäck :-) : Gee, One Bold Storm coming up….

Ein paar Takeaways von Nick Carr:

Elliotte Rusty Harold: You cannot trust the cloud (via)

Traditional payware like Oracle, Perforce, and Microsoft Office had lockin issues, but at least you controlled the software. Vendors couldn’t (usually) shut you down just because they decided your app no longer fit their business model. Cloud vendors can, and you have little to no recourse when they do.

Boring meetings? Get a canary…

Dilbert.com

Royal Pingdom: Google Apps SLA loophole allows for major downtime without consequences (via)

Coding Horror: Hardware is Cheap, Programmers are Expensive

Not quite what I had in mind. Oder wie es sich anfühlt, bei Flickr gefeuert zu werden.

Lehman-Chef Richard Fuld: Der Mann, der die Welt in die Knie zwang (via)

The 10 Coolest Open Source Products Of 2008 – inclusive Identi.ca/laconi.ca (via Cem)

InformationWeek mit dem CTO of the Year: Werner Vogels von Amazon. (via Dave). Gratulation!

Drei Posts von Garr:

10 design rules to keep in mind
(1) Communicate — don’t decorate.
(2) Speak with a visual voice.
(3) Use two typeface families maximum. OK, maybe three.
(4) Pick colors on purpose.
(5) If you can do it with less, then do it.
(6) Negative space is magical — create it, don’t just fill it up!
(7) Treat the type as image, as though it’s just as important.
(8) Be universal; remember that it’s not about you.
(9) Be decisive. Do it on purpose — or don’t do it at all.
(10) Symmetry is the ultimate evil.

Robert Scoble polarisiert ja recht häufig, trotzdem (oder gerade deshalb) zwei Posts von ihm:

Alex Payne von Twitter:  How I Use TextMate

Dare kommentiert einen Artikel von Jeff Atwood: The Myth of the Open Source Business Model Sein Ergebnis:

There are basically three business models for companies that make money from Open Source software, they are

  1. Selling support, consulting and related services for the “free” software (aka the professional open source business model ) – RedHat
  2. Dual license the code and then sell traditional software licenses to enterprise customers who are scared of the GPL – MySQL AB
  3. Build a proprietary Web application powered by Open Source software – Google

As you scan this list, it should be clear that none of these business models actually involves making money directly from selling only the software. This is problematic for developers of shrinkwrapped, consumer software such as games because none of the aforementioned business models actually works well for them.

For developers of shrinkwrapped software, Open Source only turns piracy from a problem into a benefit if you’re willing to forego building consumer software and you have software that is either too complicated to use without handholding OR you can scare a large percentage of your customers into buying traditional software licenses by using the GPL instead of the BSDL.

Peter Thomas in der FAZ über Tilt-Shift-Objektive: Wie scharf ist das denn. Dazu den hervorragenden Post von Benedikt Hotze über Architekturfotografie mit Kleinbildkamera und Shiftobjektiv

Brent Simmons über Browser CPU usage:

The thing is, web developers should test their pages for CPU usage the same as app developers do. And anytime a page is idle, CPU usage should be at 0%. Same as with any other app.

eWeek: IBM Virtual Desktop Bundles Lotus, Ubuntu Linux to Freeze Out Microsoft (via)

Phil Fersht: Emerging from the rubble of 2008: BPO has a breakthrough year

Charles Miller: My 2008 end-of-year tech stock tips. (via)

A comment thread on a blog post I can no longer find a link to saw a rosy future for Microsoft because they spend nine times as much on research and development as Apple. There’s the problem. Microsoft pour R&D money into multi-touch interfaces and come up with a table that is relegated to tech demos and gimmicky election coverage. Apple put R&D money into multi-touch and produce the frickin’ iPhone.

Of course, Windows 7 will fix everything. We’ve never heard that before.

So, das solls mal gewesen sein. Bleibt nur die Frage, welches Netbook kleine 10″-Laptop ich mir zum rumspielen gönnen soll. Muss ist eine große Platte (160+GB), Aufrüstbarkeit auf 2GB RAM und eine gewisse Robustheit. Los, wer kann was empfehlen?

Microblogging tidbits

just cleaning the cache after a few days:

Matthew Ingram on GigaOm speculating whether after the acquisition of Rael Dornfest´s Values of n by Twitter and the announced shutdown of Stikkit and I want Sandy this gets into Twitter: Will Twitter Become Your Personal Assistant?

Wayne Smallman of Blah Blah Technology on another acquisition (this time by SixApart, also shutting down the service): Pownce is dead

Dave Winer: The space between Twitter and FriendFeed:

I believe that there is space between Twitter and FriendFeed for a service that’s dumber than FriendFeed and richer than Twitter. Start with what Twitter does and add the graphics that FriendFeed has. I know some people will say that’s Pownce, but it’s not (though Pownce was pretty nice). I don’t want full blog posts, I like the 140-character limit, and I can skip out on the discussion features that FF has that Twitter doesn’t. But I think a graphic and visual Twitter would kick ass, the same way the Macintosh eventually kicked MS-DOS’s ass in the 80s and early 90s.

Robert Scoble following up on Dave: 10 Reasons why Twitter is for you and FriendFeed is not

Sarah from Regensblog (via): Get the $%&? off my lawn!!:

Can someone explain what’s special/better/shinier about Twitter? I’m really feeling like I’m missing the boat on this one.

Scott to the rescue:

Twitter is like an office water-cooler. It’s a way to hold quick and trivial conversations in real time. You might accidently learn something useful or interesting, but usually you don’t. It’s an entertaining waste of time.

Microblogging Links de jour

Tim O´Reilly loves Twitter. That´s why:

  1. Twitter is simple.
  2. Twitter works like people do.
  3. Twitter cooperates well with others.
  4. Twitter transcends the web.
  5. Twitter is user-extensible.
  6. Twitter evolves quickly.

Ray Ozzie apparently too:

… he offers some quick bites about his passions—in a style suggested, he says, by the 140-character format in Twitter. (The fact that he references Twitter and not a Microsoft product is a statement in itself.)

I love software, because if you can imagine something, you can build it.

I love Windows, because without it there would be no PC. There would be no PC developers. There might not even be a Web.

I love the ubiquitous Web because of the connections that it opened up.

I love competition. But when we’re behind a competitor, I hate it when we find ourselves just chasing their taillights.

BTW, a good characterization of Ray, IMHO.

Pownce is being acquired by SixApart and will close. Dave has a quick reflection and explains why it never really took off. Related, Steve Gillmor is of the opinion that there is no competition to Twitter or FriendFeed, not even close. Makes me wonder why he is posting spamming so much on Identi.ca. After having seen him at BearHugCamp, I am anyway without words when I think of him.

Bruce mentioning the use and value of Twitter during the Mumbai attacks.

Catch of the day

Some good picks from the last days in english, a post with german picks will follow right away:

  • ZDNet: 5 reasons to kill IT projects – seen them all, but why get companies trapped over and over and over again?
  • Seth Godin: How to make money using the Internet – simple: Connect.
  • Connect the disconnected to each other and you create value.

    * Connect advertisers to people who want to be advertised to.
    * Connect job hunters with jobs.
    * Connect information seekers with information.
    * Connect teams to each other.
    * Connect those seeking similar.
    * Connect to partners and those that can leverage your work.
    * Connect people who are proximate geographically.
    * Connect organizations spending money with ways to save money.
    * Connect like-minded people into a movement.
    * Connect people buying with people who are selling.

  • Dave Winer: It’s about the users, dummy! – true, so true:

    Listening is hard. But all people who create products for users must listen if they want to do well at making products. That includes doctors, bus drivers, mailmen, entrepreneurs, programmers, and yes, reporters and editors too. Because if you don’t listen you might miss a corner-turn and end up going off a cliff, just like the news industry is doing. They see the cliff, they know they’re headed for it, but they don’t ask how to turn the car. They don’t really want to know. I think sometimes what they want is to be missed when they lie dead in a crumpled car at the bottom of the cliff. But we don’t want that to happen. Not because we love them, but because life without them is pretty hard to imagine. They should turn the corner, no matter how painful it is. But in order to do it, they’re going to have to look out the front window and the mirrors and listen to the person in the passenger seat.

  • related, Garr Reynolds: Design means putting yourself in the user’s shoes

    Design is about many things. Above all, it’s about clarity, and intentions and about putting yourself in the position of the end users (or the customers, students, audience, etc.). When designs are not well thought out, even though it may all look good from our point of view, users get frustrated, confused, or even angry.

    The example of the hotel keycards is just brilliant.

  • Ed Brill reporting from his recent business trip to New Zealand and why good relationships are so important:

    People sometimes ask me why I think Twitter is so valuable. While we’re not directly conducting business on there very often, I do learn a lot through what others are talking about, and it helps me get a clearer picture of names in the industry. One fine example took place at the customer luncheon in Sydney last week. Someone stood up to ask me a question, and he started by telling me that he was @hollingsworth on Twitter, who had been giving me restaurant recommendations for the last few days in Sydney. Knowing who he was and that he was a Twitter user was helpful in answering his question, because it gave me an opportunity to mention TwitNotes, the Twitter plug-in for Lotus Notes 8. Our connection was immediately stronger despite having never met in-person nor even so much as heard Tony’s name before.

  • David Pogue giving a deastrous verdict on the Blackberry Storm: No Keyboard? And You Call This a BlackBerry?
  • John Maynard Keynes: The Great Slump of 1930 – interesting to read in this trouble some times. (via)

Wednesday lunch buffet

A couple of small picks from the great Internet buffet, easy to digest, with good nutrition for your brain:

  • A take on typography by Eyolf Østrem in his blog things twice, comparing LaTeX vs. Word vs. Writer. Good stuff.
  • Not many Nobel laureates have a own blog, but Paul Krugman is always worth a read: The Conscience of a Liberal
  • ChiefHomeOfficer.com linking to an interview with Guy Kawasaki. Guy admitting a mistake he made  years ago when asked to interview to be the first CEO of Yahoo! about 15 years ago. Guy said that with his second child on the way, he didn’t want to drive two hours round trip each day. He turned them down.

    If I had taken the interview and gotten the job, I would have made $2 billion and not be up at 5am doing radio interviews…

    Agreed. But I guess he is also well off, even without $2 billion ;-)

  • Technorati taking drastic measures in the current financial crisis. Well, Loic had to do this already a couple of weeks ago at Seesmic, but this does not make it better.
  • What happens if a product delivered as SaaS is discontinued? Figure out yourself if you are using I want Sandy or Stikkit. Not due to the fact that the company is hosed or run out of money, but because the founder and mastermind, Rael Dornfest has been hired by Twitter and has decided that values of n, his company is shutting down the products. Not that I have an answer, but are alternatives available? (via)

And you know why…

Twitter makes itself such an easy target if you have seen this post by Alex Payne, API Lead at Twitter:

The Internet is built wrong.

We now know, for example, that IPv4 won’t scale to the projected size of the future Internet. We know too that near-universal deployment of technologies with inadequate security and trust models, like SMTP, can mean millions if not billions lost to electronic crime, defensive measures, and reduced productivity.

Did he know this before they designed the architecture of Twitter? For me it is partly explaining why we have seen the Fail whale way too many times. Because observing one problem and not taking the learning from it to avoid it in your own projects makes you part of the problem, not of the solution.

Says one anonymous reader at Slashdot:

Payne doesn’t mention, however, that his own system, Twitter, was built wrong and is consistently down.

(via)

Mittagspost

Update Twitter from your Identi.ca account

Da isses. Die Antwort auf meine Frage von neulich:

Noch nicht ausprobiert, kommt aber gleich.

via

Update: ich weiss es nicht, hat doch glatt eine alte Message rübergeblasen nach Twitter, dann nix mehr. Geht das oder isses tot?

Update2: noch´n Dienst: Identi.ca to Twitter Bridge

Geht, auch wenn Apostrophe und Umlaute (noch?) nicht gescheit rüberkommen. Ken Sheppardson entwickelt übrigens zusammen mit Evan Prodromou laconi.ca, die Plattform für identi.ca



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