Posts Tagged 'Gmail'

Jahresende-Links

So, jetzt zum Jahresabschluss die gesammelten Links der letzten paar Wochen. Sorry, aber wegen zu vielen Reisen vor den Feiertagen und PC-Abstinenz über Weihnachten etwas verzögert:

Nicht ganz neu, aber passend zur aktuellen Eskalation im Nahen Osten: Evolutionary Psychology, Memes and the Origin of War

The present article proposes an evolutionary psychology based model of social prediction, particularly for wars and related social disruption such as riots and suicide bombers.

Frankfurt Story – Danke Robert, gut davon zu lesen, bin ja schliesslich in Frankfurt am Main geboren…

Wo ist das Geld geblieben? – Eine Spurensuche bei der Zeit

The benefits of a monthly recurring revenue model in tough economic times –  Jason Fried von 37signals. So wahr.

Palamida: In a Time of Less, Do More with Open Source: Top 25 Open Source Projects That Will Help Trim Development Budgets (via)

70 Tools Freelancers Rely on Most – auch was für euch dabei?

Und dazu Web Worker Daily: 6 Free, Open Source Resources for Web Workers

Die Jungs und Mädels von EDS sollten´s eigentlich wissen, zumindestens aber eine Meinung haben: How Will Cloud Computing Affect the Information Technology Outsourcing Marketplace? (via)

Endlich mal erklärt 😉 : But What Exactly “Is” Cloud Computing? (via)

Stefan verweist auf ein Paper zum Tema XML Performance. Lesen!

Das Wall Street Journal: Outsourcing: Not Immune to the Downturn, But Holding Up – gibt ja sicherlich noch eine Menge, die Outsourcing primär als Mittel zur Kostensenkung sehen. Der “Do my mess for less”-Ansatz geht aber schnell in die Hose, aber manch lernen eben nur durch Schmerz.

A B2B Recession Survival Kit: Three Not-so-painful Tips for Thriving in a Miserable Economy:

  • Survival Strategy #1: Cut the waste.
  • Survival Strategy #2: Harvest the “best practices” of other companies.
  • Survival Strategy #3: Ask customers what they want.

GMail Blog: SMS messaging for chat – wahrscheinlich (?) bis jetzt nur in USA

Stephen Fry reist mit leichtem Gepäck 🙂 : Gee, One Bold Storm coming up….

Ein paar Takeaways von Nick Carr:

Elliotte Rusty Harold: You cannot trust the cloud (via)

Traditional payware like Oracle, Perforce, and Microsoft Office had lockin issues, but at least you controlled the software. Vendors couldn’t (usually) shut you down just because they decided your app no longer fit their business model. Cloud vendors can, and you have little to no recourse when they do.

Boring meetings? Get a canary…

Dilbert.com

Royal Pingdom: Google Apps SLA loophole allows for major downtime without consequences (via)

Coding Horror: Hardware is Cheap, Programmers are Expensive

Not quite what I had in mind. Oder wie es sich anfühlt, bei Flickr gefeuert zu werden.

Lehman-Chef Richard Fuld: Der Mann, der die Welt in die Knie zwang (via)

The 10 Coolest Open Source Products Of 2008 – inclusive Identi.ca/laconi.ca (via Cem)

InformationWeek mit dem CTO of the Year: Werner Vogels von Amazon. (via Dave). Gratulation!

Drei Posts von Garr:

10 design rules to keep in mind
(1) Communicate — don’t decorate.
(2) Speak with a visual voice.
(3) Use two typeface families maximum. OK, maybe three.
(4) Pick colors on purpose.
(5) If you can do it with less, then do it.
(6) Negative space is magical — create it, don’t just fill it up!
(7) Treat the type as image, as though it’s just as important.
(8) Be universal; remember that it’s not about you.
(9) Be decisive. Do it on purpose — or don’t do it at all.
(10) Symmetry is the ultimate evil.

Robert Scoble polarisiert ja recht häufig, trotzdem (oder gerade deshalb) zwei Posts von ihm:

Alex Payne von Twitter:  How I Use TextMate

Dare kommentiert einen Artikel von Jeff Atwood: The Myth of the Open Source Business Model Sein Ergebnis:

There are basically three business models for companies that make money from Open Source software, they are

  1. Selling support, consulting and related services for the “free” software (aka the professional open source business model ) – RedHat
  2. Dual license the code and then sell traditional software licenses to enterprise customers who are scared of the GPL – MySQL AB
  3. Build a proprietary Web application powered by Open Source software – Google

As you scan this list, it should be clear that none of these business models actually involves making money directly from selling only the software. This is problematic for developers of shrinkwrapped, consumer software such as games because none of the aforementioned business models actually works well for them.

For developers of shrinkwrapped software, Open Source only turns piracy from a problem into a benefit if you’re willing to forego building consumer software and you have software that is either too complicated to use without handholding OR you can scare a large percentage of your customers into buying traditional software licenses by using the GPL instead of the BSDL.

Peter Thomas in der FAZ über Tilt-Shift-Objektive: Wie scharf ist das denn. Dazu den hervorragenden Post von Benedikt Hotze über Architekturfotografie mit Kleinbildkamera und Shiftobjektiv

Brent Simmons über Browser CPU usage:

The thing is, web developers should test their pages for CPU usage the same as app developers do. And anytime a page is idle, CPU usage should be at 0%. Same as with any other app.

eWeek: IBM Virtual Desktop Bundles Lotus, Ubuntu Linux to Freeze Out Microsoft (via)

Phil Fersht: Emerging from the rubble of 2008: BPO has a breakthrough year

Charles Miller: My 2008 end-of-year tech stock tips. (via)

A comment thread on a blog post I can no longer find a link to saw a rosy future for Microsoft because they spend nine times as much on research and development as Apple. There’s the problem. Microsoft pour R&D money into multi-touch interfaces and come up with a table that is relegated to tech demos and gimmicky election coverage. Apple put R&D money into multi-touch and produce the frickin’ iPhone.

Of course, Windows 7 will fix everything. We’ve never heard that before.

So, das solls mal gewesen sein. Bleibt nur die Frage, welches Netbook kleine 10″-Laptop ich mir zum rumspielen gönnen soll. Muss ist eine große Platte (160+GB), Aufrüstbarkeit auf 2GB RAM und eine gewisse Robustheit. Los, wer kann was empfehlen?

Advertisements

Various topics

Emil Stenström: Follow the 10 ground rules, or fail on the web

1. Everyone is anonymous on the web, if they want to

2. Give your content away for free, or watch someone else do it

3. Linking is the core of the web, make people want to link to you

4. Link to external sites with good content, it’s all about servicing your users

5. People will copy your content, and there’s nothing you can do about it

6. Use the web to communicate with your users, or watch your impact fade

7. Communicate with your users in natural language, marketing speech has no place on the web

8. Be honest about what your strengths are, liars are easily uncovered

9. Care about search engines, and double your number of users

10. Encouraging and acting upon feedback is currently the best form of marketing

Managing Leadership: Exploiting Success

The best cost-cutting program would shut down the programs which are eating up 80% of your effort for only 20% of your return. Then redeploy the assets that had been wastefully tied up in them to where they can exploit success and help create increased revenue, rather than leave them reinforcing failure and generating unproductive costs.

Dilbert.com

Coding Horror: The Problem With Logging

When it comes to logging, the right answer is not “yes, always, and as much as possible.” Resist the tendency to log everything. Start small and simple, logging only the most obvious and critical of errors. Add (or ideally, inject) more logging only as demonstrated by specific, verifiable needs.

Wayne Smallmann: Ebook: Beginner’s Guide to Social Media. Download here. Worth a read.

The Daily Mail: How they shot The Godfather. FAN-TAS-TIC.

Volker calls this the Mother of all Demos. Indeed. And this happened already 40 years ago.

Why the simple recipe “Use Unicode” does not really work when you think a second longer about the challenges you will face when internationalization of an application (via).

Lifehacker: Top 10 Things You Forgot Gmail Can Do

10. Change Gmail’s look entirely with themes.

9. Launch video and audio chats, no Skype required.

8. Back up your email from any system.

7. See all the places where you’re signed in, and remotely sign out.

6. Serve as a central, synchronized, smarter contact list.

5. Consolidate all your email accounts.

4. Help friends find their own Gmail messages or bookmark your own.

3. Keep your Gmail account(s) on your desktop.

2. Give you total search power.

1. Do much, much more with Gmail Labs experimental features.

CIO.com: 7 Things IT Managers Should Know About Lotus Notes (via)

1. Notes is more than “just e-mail.”

2. Notes and Domino is a powerful (and open) application development platform.

3. Notes is the client, Domino is the server.

4. Notes has a long history of backward compatibility.

5. Replication lets you work both online and offline.

6. Notes applications can be built for both the Notes client and for Web browsers.

7. Notes is “not dead.”

Links on a grey Tuesday

Looking outside the window you get the impression today that it is already late afternoon. But its only 14.45. Early December, after all.

Two examples why it is always worth to have a look at Garr´s PresentationZen:

Lifehacker on GMail´s Canned Responses: Which Emails Should You Standardize?

The year is coming to an end and many salespeople have to make their budget. Vinnie on Top 10 Stupid Salespeople Tricks – a Rerun. Consider yourself warned.

Erick Mack and David Allen are preparing their Lotusphere session. Interesting to listen to the Podcast: Listen in as David and I discuss Notes and Lotusphere 2009

Blogger Obiutary: Doris Dungey, Prescient Finance Blogger, Dies at 47

The Aardvark no longer speaks. (via)

Joel Spolsky on his style of leadership: How Hard Could It Be? Recommended!

Wired: How Gadgets Helped Mumbai Attackers

Coding Horror: Tending your software garden

I had mentioned Dave´s post on listening lately, but there is more: Jay Rosen in an interesting thread on Friendfeed, where journalists argue why they do not listen to users. And Dave again: If you never listen you never learn. Full ack.

WebWorkerDaily reminds to take the Time to Think Twice About Free.

Powers of Empathy. Read the post and figure out, whose words are looked at. (via)

Looking to 2009: Phil Fersht chatting with Peter Allen of TPI

Another post by 37signals on their use of Amazon EC2: Using the EC2 environment for fewer moving parts

Und noch ein paar für die deutschsprachigen Leser:

Selbsttest – Welche Bürotypen nerven Sie? (via)

Alle Jahre wieder: Der verflixte Resturlaub

Links in between two meetings

Today in Oslo for negotiations with suppliers and other meetings. In between two meetings a few links to share with you:

Und zwei deutsche Artikel, beide aus der FAZ:

  • Erschreckend: ICE-Unfall in Fulda: Kritik am Sicherheitskonzept für Schnellstrecke

    Nur zwei Sätze im Gutachten enthalten Lob: „Der Einsatz der Rettungskräfte ist positiv zu bewerten. Aufgrund der durchgeführten Übung waren die Aufgaben und Einsatzstellen sowie die Einsatzorganisationen bekannt.“

  • Jammern auf hohem Niveau: SAP-Chef Kagermann: „Die IT-Branche muss nicht an den Tropf“

    Als andere Firmen Tausende Stellen kappten, haben wir eine bis dahin auch für uns kaum vorstellbare Strategie der Globalisierung durchgezogen. Wir gewannen kontinuierlich Marktanteile, stockten die Belegschaft weiter auf und haben heute Gewinnspannen von 28 Prozent. Wir sind also nicht ganz unerfahren im offensiven Umgang mit Krisen.

Afternoon Firefox Tab declutter

Ahhhh well, I just need to close some of the quite long open tabs in Firefox. So please enjoy what I had open and was hesitant to close up to now. Maybe some pearls for you as well:

  • Nick Carr: Googley treats for Goose Creek:

    There are a few things we know about Google data centers:
    1. They cost $600 million.
    2. They employ 200 people.
    3. They open with a down-home ribbon-cutting ceremony featuring politicians, oversized scissors, a local band, balloons, and a tent stocked with “Googley treats.”

  • Scott Berkun: Asshole driven development (via)
  • Google Mobile Blog: Gmail for mobile 2.0 – I have it on the Bold and it is much better than the old version
  • Suzanne Vega in the New York Times: Tom´s Essay (via)
  • Jack Cheng: Stuff I love (via) – geniale Idee für einen Kalender
  • heise.de: SAP will sich von Outsourcing-Tochter trennen – Wahrscheinlich skalieren die nicht genug. Und SAP-Hosting ist mittlerweile ein Commodity, das erst oberhalb von 10.000 Seats profitabel zu betreiben ist.
  • Loic le Meur: 24 hours with a G1 Google Phone: “Put a G1 next to an iPhone and it feels like a poorly designed cheap Huyndai next to the latest BMW coupe.”
  • Nick Carr, again: And now for the enterprise … – Why 2009 is a crucial year for Amazon Web Services and which opportunities the current situation brings
  • Dave Winer playing with Windows on AWS: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 -This seems to have some rough edges, but hey, they are still in Beta (for Windows on AWS, at least)
  • Mike Chirico: SQLite Tutorial – Good reference, if you need to work/play with SQLite.
  • heise.de: SAP erwartet Abwärtstrend – War zu erwarten. Der Mittelstand steht auf der Investitionsbremse, die Großunternehmen sind versorgt und die Adoption des neuen Lizenzmodells geht auch nicht so wie erwartet.
  • Vinnie Mirchandani: What software consolidation? – “MISO (Microsoft, IBM, SAP and Oracle) only accounts for a third of the total global revenues of roughly $ 450 billion.”
  • Tim O´Reilly: Web 2.0 and Cloud Computing and the response from Nick Carr: What Tim O’Reilly gets wrong about the cloud – Both worth to read. What is your view? Update: Tim has commented on Nicks post and Nick responds: Further musings on the network effect and the cloud
  • The Economist on Cloud Computing: Let it rise. A free PDF of the special report is available here. (via)
  • die FAZ in der Besprechung des Buches “Marke Eigenbau” von Holm Friebe und Thomas Ramge: “Das alles aber schmälert keineswegs die Bedeutung des Ansatzes von Friebe und Ramge, der einen weitreichenden Perspektivwechsel mit sich bringt. Am Beginn des Rundfunks standen die Radiobastler. Schnell schon wurde ihnen verboten, selbst zu senden. Schließlich ging man auch gegen den Zusammenbau der Empfangsgeräte vor. Nun sieht der Rundfunk seinem Ende entgegen – der Bastler aber hat ihn überlebt. Vielleicht und hoffentlich gilt ja tatsächlich Ähnliches für die Rundökonomie.” Cem hat das Buch bereits Anfang September kurz vorgestellt.
  • heise.de: Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 ist fertig – Unterstützt Virtual Server, Hyper-V, VMware Server, VMware ESX and VMware GSX. Interessant.