Posts Tagged 'AWS'

Amazon EC2 in Europe

Amazon, doing it again (have I said this not so long ago as well?).

Werner Vogels: Expanding the Cloud: Amazon EC2 in Europe

These are three of the main drivers for the requests by our customers

  1. Lower latency from EC2 instances to their clients. The European Region can be accessed with low latency from all major European network hubs.
  2. Low latency access to data stored in the Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3). A large number of customers have stored data into the European Region of Amazon S3. With the new European region this data can now be accessed with low latency from within EC2 at no cost
  3. Regulatory requirements may require that data be stored in the EU and/or processing take place within the EU. With the European Regions of Amazon S3 and Amazon EC2 developers now can address those requirements.

(via)

Find the details here.

M. David Peterson commenting on O´Reilly: EUC2?

Having been a part of the private beta cycle for the EC2:EU data center I have to admit that the Amazon Web Services team is getting /incredibly good/ at keeping a low profile during the development of new products, releasing them as production services to the world at mind numbing speeds. It wasn’t long ago that a private beta cycle for an AWS-based service would last 6-9 months. Now?

Not very long. At all.

This is the thing that competitors such as Microsoft need to pay the most attention to:

Getting production services into the hands of paying customers as quickly as possible w/o attempting to boil the ocean. In other words, one web service at a time. One could easily have seen a process in which someone@AWS back in the 2005/6 time frame said: “To do this right, we need multiple data centers in multiple locations across the planet before we can launch. And what good is a storage service if we don’t offer computing services and a queue service and a database service as well? We’ll get laughed off the utility computing planet!” attempting to boil the utility computing ocean in one go. Given the leap frog lead AWS now has on everyone in the marketplace, that obviously would have been a big mistake.

Fortunately — for both them and for us — they were smart enough to realize winning customers one data center and one web service at a time was the way go.

And this is what it is all about to be successful. Do one thing at a time, do this good, take the learnings and go for the next target. Do not try to swallow the elephant in one go and fail.

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Links on a grey Tuesday

Looking outside the window you get the impression today that it is already late afternoon. But its only 14.45. Early December, after all.

Two examples why it is always worth to have a look at Garr´s PresentationZen:

Lifehacker on GMail´s Canned Responses: Which Emails Should You Standardize?

The year is coming to an end and many salespeople have to make their budget. Vinnie on Top 10 Stupid Salespeople Tricks – a Rerun. Consider yourself warned.

Erick Mack and David Allen are preparing their Lotusphere session. Interesting to listen to the Podcast: Listen in as David and I discuss Notes and Lotusphere 2009

Blogger Obiutary: Doris Dungey, Prescient Finance Blogger, Dies at 47

The Aardvark no longer speaks. (via)

Joel Spolsky on his style of leadership: How Hard Could It Be? Recommended!

Wired: How Gadgets Helped Mumbai Attackers

Coding Horror: Tending your software garden

I had mentioned Dave´s post on listening lately, but there is more: Jay Rosen in an interesting thread on Friendfeed, where journalists argue why they do not listen to users. And Dave again: If you never listen you never learn. Full ack.

WebWorkerDaily reminds to take the Time to Think Twice About Free.

Powers of Empathy. Read the post and figure out, whose words are looked at. (via)

Looking to 2009: Phil Fersht chatting with Peter Allen of TPI

Another post by 37signals on their use of Amazon EC2: Using the EC2 environment for fewer moving parts

Und noch ein paar für die deutschsprachigen Leser:

Selbsttest – Welche Bürotypen nerven Sie? (via)

Alle Jahre wieder: Der verflixte Resturlaub

Bunch of Cloud Computing links

Cloud week

(El Alamein 1942: British Matilda tanks move forward at Tobruk)

This is an interesting week. And the battle for the cloud has increased its intensity.

We had Microsoft reveal its Cloud Stratey on the PDC with Azure. We also had the debate between Tim O´Reilly and Nick Carr, which I touched briefly upon.

Today I find further interesting pieces (via). Tim Bray discusses “The Shape of the Cloud“, and is reminded of Altavista (the dominating search-engine that was before Google, ya know?). But he mentions very important topics which he believes are true:

Monopolies Don’t Require Lock-in

Low Barriers to Entry Win

Economies of Scale

CIOs Aren’t Stupid

and the analogy to Altavista:

Amazon Web Services smells like Altavista to me; a huge step in a good direction. But there are some very good Big Ideas waiting out there to launch, probably incubating right now in a garage or grad school.

Such an idea doesn’t have to come from a big company. And it doesn’t have to be proprietary to grow fast and dominate the landscape. It has to have no aroma of lock-in, it has to be obviously better, and most of all, more than anything else, it has to be really, really easy to get started with.

And he is absolutely right.

Eric Larson adds another important point:

The essence is that we haven’t quite found the sweet spot for deploying apps to the cloud.

I would imagine there will be two progressions that will allow deployment on the cloud become mainstream. The first is languages will create a simple way to wrap up an application with all its libraries, much like a desktop application. The second is that cloud service providers will change from supporting a language or virtual machine to supporting a process. The idea is that if I can take my web app, zip it up and throw it on their server with a simple bash script they can monitor and scale by adding more processes, then it seems feasible we might see could computing environments that are essentially like the current wealth of shared hosting services.

Being able to start small is going to be the killer feature of the next generation cloud platforms. We are not there yet, but folks seem to be quickly narrowing in on hitting that sweet spot.

Fully agreed.

Update: I had it open in another tab, but forgot to include here. Microsoft has yesterday on PDC also showed their offering for Office functionality on the web that is supposed to compete against Google Apps, Zoho and alike. Nick comments:

The battle is joined. The outcome will be determined not only by whether Microsoft will be able to maintain its dominance of the Office market but also by whether it can maintain the outsized revenues and profits it has long enjoyed in that market.

Interesting times, really.

Update 2:

Vinnie asks “Wrong Side or Wrong Cloud?” and links to Bob Warfield who summarizes the debate between Nick Carr and Tim O´Reilly: Cloud Computing Network Effects, Or Why Tim O’Reilly and Nick Carr Are Both Wrong. It started with a post from Hugh McLeod: “the cloud’s best-kept secret“. He blieves that cloud computing will lead to a huge monopoly. Time will tell.

Finally, Nick adds a typology of network strategies. Interesting reads, all of them.

Autumn clouds

Well, it´s just little more than three weeks go that I posted about the Steve Ballmer keynote in London where he did not hide that we are going to see Microsoft enter the cloud as well, beyond AWS also providing Windows servers on their platform.

Today, on the Professional Developers Conference 2008, Microsoft unveils Azure, their services platform that is going to compete with Google´s App Engine or Amazon Web Services.

Microsoft describes Azure this way:

Windows® Azure is a cloud services operating system that serves as the development, service hosting and service management environment for the Azure Services Platform. Windows Azure provides developers with on-demand compute and storage to host, scale, and manage internet or cloud applications. Windows Azure supports a consistent development experience through its integration with Visual Studio. In the early stages of CTP, .NET managed applications built using Visual Studio will be supported. Windows Azure is an open platform that will support both Microsoft and non-Microsoft languages and environments. Windows Azure welcomes third party tools and languages such as Eclipse, Ruby, PHP, and Python.

I guess it will be quite some interesting times ahead, given Microsoft´s financial strength and ability to execute. Curious though, how open the Azure platform will be.

Nick Carr, in early commentary:

Azure will compete with other cloud platforms, such as Amazon Web Services, Google App Engine, and Salesforce.com’s force.com, and, given Microsoft’s enormous scale and influence in the software industry, its launch marks a milestone in the history of utility computing. The cloud is now firmly in the mainstream.

Cannot agree more.

Afternoon Firefox Tab declutter

Ahhhh well, I just need to close some of the quite long open tabs in Firefox. So please enjoy what I had open and was hesitant to close up to now. Maybe some pearls for you as well:

  • Nick Carr: Googley treats for Goose Creek:

    There are a few things we know about Google data centers:
    1. They cost $600 million.
    2. They employ 200 people.
    3. They open with a down-home ribbon-cutting ceremony featuring politicians, oversized scissors, a local band, balloons, and a tent stocked with “Googley treats.”

  • Scott Berkun: Asshole driven development (via)
  • Google Mobile Blog: Gmail for mobile 2.0 – I have it on the Bold and it is much better than the old version
  • Suzanne Vega in the New York Times: Tom´s Essay (via)
  • Jack Cheng: Stuff I love (via) – geniale Idee für einen Kalender
  • heise.de: SAP will sich von Outsourcing-Tochter trennen – Wahrscheinlich skalieren die nicht genug. Und SAP-Hosting ist mittlerweile ein Commodity, das erst oberhalb von 10.000 Seats profitabel zu betreiben ist.
  • Loic le Meur: 24 hours with a G1 Google Phone: “Put a G1 next to an iPhone and it feels like a poorly designed cheap Huyndai next to the latest BMW coupe.”
  • Nick Carr, again: And now for the enterprise … – Why 2009 is a crucial year for Amazon Web Services and which opportunities the current situation brings
  • Dave Winer playing with Windows on AWS: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 -This seems to have some rough edges, but hey, they are still in Beta (for Windows on AWS, at least)
  • Mike Chirico: SQLite Tutorial – Good reference, if you need to work/play with SQLite.
  • heise.de: SAP erwartet Abwärtstrend – War zu erwarten. Der Mittelstand steht auf der Investitionsbremse, die Großunternehmen sind versorgt und die Adoption des neuen Lizenzmodells geht auch nicht so wie erwartet.
  • Vinnie Mirchandani: What software consolidation? – “MISO (Microsoft, IBM, SAP and Oracle) only accounts for a third of the total global revenues of roughly $ 450 billion.”
  • Tim O´Reilly: Web 2.0 and Cloud Computing and the response from Nick Carr: What Tim O’Reilly gets wrong about the cloud – Both worth to read. What is your view? Update: Tim has commented on Nicks post and Nick responds: Further musings on the network effect and the cloud
  • The Economist on Cloud Computing: Let it rise. A free PDF of the special report is available here. (via)
  • die FAZ in der Besprechung des Buches “Marke Eigenbau” von Holm Friebe und Thomas Ramge: “Das alles aber schmälert keineswegs die Bedeutung des Ansatzes von Friebe und Ramge, der einen weitreichenden Perspektivwechsel mit sich bringt. Am Beginn des Rundfunks standen die Radiobastler. Schnell schon wurde ihnen verboten, selbst zu senden. Schließlich ging man auch gegen den Zusammenbau der Empfangsgeräte vor. Nun sieht der Rundfunk seinem Ende entgegen – der Bastler aber hat ihn überlebt. Vielleicht und hoffentlich gilt ja tatsächlich Ähnliches für die Rundökonomie.” Cem hat das Buch bereits Anfang September kurz vorgestellt.
  • heise.de: Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 ist fertig – Unterstützt Virtual Server, Hyper-V, VMware Server, VMware ESX and VMware GSX. Interessant.

Amazon senkt die Preise für S3

gerade gesehen, wie ich den Feedreader abarbeite:

Om  Malik: Amazon Cuts Prices on S3

Details auf dem AWS Blog, zusammen mit einer Übersicht der neuen Preise:

Tier US EU Description
0-50 TB $0.150/GB $0.180/GB First 50 TB per month of storage used
50-100 TB $0.140/GB $0.170/GB Next 50 TB per month of storage used
100-500 TB $0.130/GB $0.160/GB Next 400 TB per month of storage used
500+ TB $0.120/GB $0.150/GB Storage used per month over 500 TB

Die Nutzung nimmt weiterhin ordentlich zu. Om Malik:

Amazon, in making the announcement, gave some interesting data points:

* Currently there are over 29 billion objects stored in Amazon S3 vs. 22 billion at the end of Q2 2008. That is sequential growth of 32 percent.
*On Oct. 1, the service peaked at over 70,000 requests per second to store, retrieve, or delete an object.
* Over 400,000 developers have registered to use Amazon Web Service.

Und auch die Kunden sind nicht nur Startups.