Posts Tagged 'Amazon'

Kindle 2

xkcd.com:

I had the same thought.

Peter Kafka in Media Memo on All Things Digital commenting on Jeff Bezos pitch lately in “The Daily Show” with host Jon Stewart:

That is: For some folks, the ability to download books over the air, store a gazillion titles on a single device and have a “freaky” voice read them aloud to you are compelling reasons to shell out $359 for the gadget. For skeptics like Stewart, it’s hard to see how Amazon (AMZN) has improved upon the ink-and-paper book, which uses technology that has worked pretty well for several hundred years.

And cnet Crave on Designing the Kindle 2:

“One of the great things about Kindle is it doesn’t ever get hot,” Amazon Vice President Ian Freed said in an interview at Amazon’s downtown office here. That’s important, Freed said, given that the company has one main goal with the Kindle–making the product as invisible to users as possible when they are reading.

“The most important thing for the Kindle to do is to disappear,” Freed said. That was the goal with the first device and was also a key factor in deciding what would go in the sequel, which started shipping on Monday. There are the obvious factors, like the thinner, sleeker design. But there are also things like an improved cellular modem. As a result, Kindle users will find themselves out of range in fewer places to get updates or buy a new book.

Well, for us Europeans it is anyway not yet available. I will have a look at it, when it comes over, but for the time being I like my dead tree library.

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Amazon EC2 in Europe

Amazon, doing it again (have I said this not so long ago as well?).

Werner Vogels: Expanding the Cloud: Amazon EC2 in Europe

These are three of the main drivers for the requests by our customers

  1. Lower latency from EC2 instances to their clients. The European Region can be accessed with low latency from all major European network hubs.
  2. Low latency access to data stored in the Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3). A large number of customers have stored data into the European Region of Amazon S3. With the new European region this data can now be accessed with low latency from within EC2 at no cost
  3. Regulatory requirements may require that data be stored in the EU and/or processing take place within the EU. With the European Regions of Amazon S3 and Amazon EC2 developers now can address those requirements.

(via)

Find the details here.

M. David Peterson commenting on O´Reilly: EUC2?

Having been a part of the private beta cycle for the EC2:EU data center I have to admit that the Amazon Web Services team is getting /incredibly good/ at keeping a low profile during the development of new products, releasing them as production services to the world at mind numbing speeds. It wasn’t long ago that a private beta cycle for an AWS-based service would last 6-9 months. Now?

Not very long. At all.

This is the thing that competitors such as Microsoft need to pay the most attention to:

Getting production services into the hands of paying customers as quickly as possible w/o attempting to boil the ocean. In other words, one web service at a time. One could easily have seen a process in which someone@AWS back in the 2005/6 time frame said: “To do this right, we need multiple data centers in multiple locations across the planet before we can launch. And what good is a storage service if we don’t offer computing services and a queue service and a database service as well? We’ll get laughed off the utility computing planet!” attempting to boil the utility computing ocean in one go. Given the leap frog lead AWS now has on everyone in the marketplace, that obviously would have been a big mistake.

Fortunately — for both them and for us — they were smart enough to realize winning customers one data center and one web service at a time was the way go.

And this is what it is all about to be successful. Do one thing at a time, do this good, take the learnings and go for the next target. Do not try to swallow the elephant in one go and fail.

Amazon CloudFront

Werner Vogels, CTO Amazon:

Today marks the launch of Amazon CloudFront, the new Amazon Web Service for content delivery. It integrates seamlessly with Amazon S3 to provide low-latency distribution of content with high data transfer speeds through a world-wide network of edge locations. It requires no upfront commitments and is a pay-as-you-go service in the same style as the other Amazon Web Services.

Expanding the Cloud, another time. (via)